Asian Style Spicy Noodles

My flight from Narita International Airport outside of Tokyo to Bangkok’s Don Muang International Airport had been pleasant and uneventful.  I arrived at 5:00 PM on a Sunday afternoon and, following my journey through customs and baggage claim, was met by the distributors who were going to be my hosts during my days of business in Thailand.  It was my first trip to this land of exotic architecture and cuisine and I was eager to enjoy my first genuine Thai culinary adventure that evening.  After checking into my hotel on the banks of the Chao Phraya River we proceeded to a local restaurant… without walls!  The open kitchen was located in the center of this large, popular dining establishment…  our protection from the elements was an immense galvanized sheet metal roof.  As we were seated near the perimeter of the restaurant we sat down to the inviting fragrance of lush tropical plants and flowers just a few feet away… and the sound of rain pounding down on the galvanized roof overhead.  It was paradise!

My hosts asked me if I had ever had Thai food before.  My response was an ethusiastic “Yes!” and I continued on by telling them that the more heat it had the better I liked it.  They, without question, took that as a challenge as they began pouring over the many selections available on the extensive menu.  I knew I was in for trouble when they began whispering between themselves, pointing to specific items on the menu… chuckling as they gleefully looked at me while finalizing the evening’s menu.  About that time two large pitchers of Singha beer arrived at the table… not one, but two!  I was genuinely beginning to wonder what I had gotten myself into… and began preparing myself mentally for what was obviously going to be a fiery culinary event between two local Thai men and an ignorant American who obviously in their minds had no clue as to the fiery power of the capsaicins they ingested every day!

Heaping platters and fragrant bowls began arriving at the table at a steady pace.  Singha was poured… the challenge was about to begin!  As I looked at the copious amounts of food in front of us I knew that there were two sets of eyes that were going to be closely monitoring those first bites of food as they left the plate and traveled to my mouth.  Both men smiled with anticipatory glee as I began chewing that first bite.  I swallowed, swilled down a gulp or two of Singha and continued on without as much as wincing.  My hosts seemed to be disappointed at my lack of expected reaction… even though my mouth was on fire!  The two of them began eating and, within moments, had beads of sweat pouring from their foreheads… their white handkerchiefs soon soaking wet.  By the end of the meal I had earned the greatest of respect and was pronounced a connoisseur of genuine Thai food amidst celebratory fanfare!

One of the joys of living in the San Francisco Bay Area is the ability to obtain ingredients for dishes from nearly every region of the globe.  Experimenting with various combinations of fruits, vegetables, meats  and spices from all over the world is an everyday occurrence in our kitchen.  On any particular day we may crave the flavors of the Mediterranean… or a dish of spicy noodles with Asian overtones… and can prepare either with great ease.   These delicious Asian-Style Spicy Noodles are definitely not akin to the fiery dishes I had that eventful night in Bangkok and will certainly satisfy the palate of those longing for a quick and delicious meal that will transport the heart and soul to the exotic East.

Asian-Style Spicy Noodles

For the stir-fry prepare and set aside:

  • 1 lb pork cutlets, cut into thin strips

Season the pork with:

  • All-Purpose Meat Rub

Set aside:

  • 1 bunch green onions, sliced

  • 2 handfuls baby shiitaki mushrooms, stems intact

  • 5 whole cloves peeled garlic, finely minced

  • 2 inches fresh ginger root, grated
  • 5 cups napa cabbage, shredded

  • 2 T smooth peanut butter
  • 1/3 C Tamari
  • 1 C chicken stock
  • 2 T curry powder
  • 1 T freshly squeezed lime juice

Bring a pot of water to a boil for the pasta.  Add salt, return to a boil, add and and cook to al dente:

  • 1 lb whole wheat spaghetti

When the pasta is added to the boiling salted water heat in a wok over high heat:

  • 3 T peanut or cannola oil

When the oil is smoking hot add:

  • the seasoned pork strips

Cook till browned and transfer to the side to drain:

To the wok add:

  • the reserved minced garlic
  • the reserved grated ginger

Stir quickly until the garlic begins to become translucent.  Immediately add:

  • the reserved shiitake mushrooms
  • the reserved green onions

Stir-fry for 1 – 2 minutes then make a small well in the bottom of the wok.  Quickly add:

  • the Tamari sauce
  • the peanut butter
  • the chicken stock
  • the lime juice
  • the curry powder

Continue to stir-fry as the sauce thickens.  Add:

  • the reserved pork strips

 

  • the shredded napa cabbage

Stir fry for an additional minute or two.  Drain and divide the pasta between 4 heated pasta bowls and top with the stir-fry.  Garnish with:

  • cilantro, coarsely chopped
  • salted peanuts
  • Sriracha or other hot sauce, to taste (optional)

Serve immediately… Bon Appetit!

Copyright 2010 Via Aurea Designs, Inc., All Rights Reserved

Advertisements

Tags:

Categories: Pasta, Pork

Author:Steve Meyer & Dayton Azevedo

Food and fine cooking have been our passion for many years, fueled by the year-around abundance of fresh fruits, vegetables, poultry and meats, as well as aromatic spices and herbs readily available to us here in the San Francisco Bay Area, making adventuresome, creative and delicious 5-star cooking a reality in our kitchen. Our aim is to make it yours as well by utilizing our step by step instructions and serial photographs. Bon Appetit from our kitchen to yours...!

Subscribe

Subscribe to our RSS feed and social profiles to receive updates.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: